A pair of reports reach similar conclusions about some of the threats growing in cyberspace and the industries likely to be most affected.

A pair of research reports released today paint a picture of a cyberthreat landscape that is continuing to evolve in ways both expected and not. The reports, released by Netscout and Akamai, each look at the overall threat landscape from its own perspective and offer a slightly different view of what cybersecurity professionals face. Together, they reach similar conclusions about some of the threats growing in cyberspace and some of the industries likely to be most affected.
The “Netscout Threat Intelligence Report” focuses on large organizations, such as nation-state actors, and the the impact they’re having on both statecraft and industries important to various nations. According to Richard Hummel, manager, Netscout Threat Intelligence, the number of groups working on behalf of national security organizations has skyrocketed.
“A couple of years ago, I would tell you that there were probably 35 to 40 different groups, and that’s predominantly China, Iran, Russia — some of the really big names,” he says. “But now with Netscout we’re actively tracking at least 35 of these groups ourselves, and we know of at least 170 more different groups around the globe where you have these nation states adding cyberattack capabilities to their statecraft.”
Those groups are growing in sophistication and broadening their target groups, as well. The report says academia, government, finance, and telecommunications are the targeted industries.
Another large and growing group of threat actors are criminal organizations that now have activities reaching around the globe. “The criminal organizations and the nation-state groups really have a lot of similarities,” Hummel says. “They both have large-scale operations. They both have access to a lot of really skilled operators. They’re able to throw money at their problems to …

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Author: Curtis Franklin Jr. Senior Editor at Dark Reading

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