A new strain of point-of-sale malware skims credit card numbers and comes via a highly polished marketing campaign.

Malware is constantly evolving and, according to a new blog post from Cisco Talos, so is malware marketing. The point-of-sale (PoS) malware being sold, called GlitchPOS, isn’t particularly advanced, but its packaging and marketing are — and those advanced techniques promise new troubles for security professionals working in retail and hospitality fields.
In the blog post, researchers detail how they found the malware on a crimewave forum and rapidly discovered that it comes complete with video instructions on its use and a modular format that makes putting it in the field quite easy.
How easy is it to deploy? “I would say it’s about the sophistication of installing a video game,” says Craig Williams, director of outreach at Cisco Talos. As a consequence, “My concern is that you’re going to see younger and younger cybercriminals with kits like these. It’s just getting easier and easier,” he explains.
The growing sophistication of GlitchPOS is similar to that found in the marketing and support of Cayosin, malware with a sophisticated sales infrastructure that was discovered by researchers at Perch in February. In that case, Perch senior threat researcher Paul Scott pointed out that the malware’s author “… has got 127 posts, he’s got 1,382 followers and he’s following 306 accounts.” The Cayosin author offered individual support through direct messages as well as video and photo support showing how to create attacks on his network.
GlitchPOS’s author, identified as edbitss by researchers at Cisco Talos and Check Point, claims authorship of the DiamondFox L!NK botnet in 2015/2016 and 2017, according to the Cisco Talos blog post. Williams says that while DiamondFox L!NK was sophisticated, “The author has polished this” and improved both the malware and its marketing.
Although the malware …

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Author: Curtis Franklin Jr. Senior Editor at Dark Reading

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